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Parking Pains – do you know the rules?

Parking Pains – do you know the rules?

Ooo… we love a little quiz, and if we can also help you learn a thing or two – even better! So, find out how much you know about the UKs parking laws, it’ll help you avoid a parking fine.

And, as we like to be as helpful as we can, here’s how to appeal if you think you’ve received an unfair parking fine.

Right, let’s get started. Give yourself a point for each answer you get right. There are 20 points on offer.

How much do you know?

The following are true or false questions about how, where and when you can park on the UKs roads.

Some of these questions have more than one answer, so choose all that apply and give yourself one point for each answer you get right.

1.When parking on the roadside, which of these MUST you do:

(a) Park facing oncoming traffic.

(b) Switch off your engine.

(c) Park with one wheel on the footpath.

(d) Put your hand brake on.

(e) Not hit anyone when you open your door.

2.Where are you never allowed to stop or park?

(a) On a pedestrian crossing.

(b) On a one lane track.

(c) On a tram or cycle way when it’s in use.

(d) In taxi or bus bays.

(e) Outside a bank.

(f) Within 30 meters of a junction.

(g) Near a school entrance.

(h) Outside a police station.

Answer true or false to these...

3.I am allowed to park on the pavement at any time.

4.I can park on single yellow lines at any time.

5.I need to use parking lights when parked on the road or in a lay-by at night.

Now, look at these road signs and markings and choose what you think they mean?


(a) No loading at any time.

(b) Loading is allowed in the daytime.

(c) Stopping is prohibited between 10am and 6pm.


(a) Parking except for cycles.

(b) Parking place for cycles only.

(c) Parking for cars carrying cycles only.


(a) No stopping or parking at any time between the dates shown, unless loading or unloading heavy goods or passengers.

(b) Stop here at any time between dates shown.

(c) Only stop here in the daytime between dates shown for loading and unloading passengers.


(a) No parking for cars allowed on Sundays.

(b) Free on street parking for cars allowed at any time.

(c) Parking for cars is restricted to Sundays only.


(a) Parking on the verge or footpath is not permitted at any time.

(b) Park only permitted is one wheel is on a grass verge or footpath.

(c) Vehicles may be parked partially on the footpath or verge.


(a) Stopping only allowed for the next seven miles.

(b) No stopping unless dropping off or picking up passengers.

(c) No stopping at all on a clearway, not even for setting down or picking up, but you can stop in a lay-by.


(a) No parking for the next mile.

(b) Parking in one mile.

(c) You can park anywhere in the next mile.


(a) Waiting prohibited between times shown on the sign.

(b) Only park during the times shown.

(c) Parking for buses only between the times show.n


(a) No waiting at any time during the months indicated on the sign in the direction of the arrow. No waiting at any time in the opposite direction of the arrow.

(b) Parking permitted at any time in the direction of the arrow, but prohibited for the months shown in the opposite direction of the arrow.

(c) Stopping only allowed for one hour, with no return in 2 hours, in the direction of the arrow. Stopping for one hour, with no restrictions on returning in the other direction.


(a) No parking zone ends.

(b) End of free parking zone.

(c) End of controlled parking zone.

How did you find that? Was it easier or harder than you thought?

The Answers

To find out how well you did, here are the answers:

1.b, d and e are true

2.a, c, d, g are true

3.false – you are not allowed park either partially or wholly on the pavement at any time in London. In other places you can, but only when signs allow it.

4.false – you can only park on these during the times detailed on the parking restriction signs shown, or when unloading passengers or heavy, bulky goods.